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POLYFLUOROALKYL

Double Cheeseburger

A beefburger with a slice of cheese on it, served in a bread roll. If the cow was exposed to C8 before being made into a beef patty, this would provide C8 a pathway into the consumer’s system through ingestion.

Ingredients:

· Brioche Bun

· Ground beef

· Polyfluoroalkyl substances (C8)

· Cheese slice


Calories: 440

Open Project

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POLYFLUOROALKYL

Cow

a fully grown female animal of a domesticated breed of ox, kept to produce milk or beef. If the cow was exposed to C8 prior to producing beef or milk, ingestion of these products would provide a pathway for C8 into the consumer’s system.

Ingredients:

· Organic matter


Calories: 1.1 Million

Open Project

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POLYFLUOROALKYL

Cow

a fully grown female animal of a domesticated breed of ox, kept to produce milk or beef. If the cow was exposed to C8 prior to producing beef or milk, ingestion of these products would provide a pathway for C8 into the consumer’s system.

Ingredients:

· Organic matter


Calories: 1.1 Million

Open Project

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POLYFLUOROALKYL

Non-Stick Frying Pan

Cookware with a non-stick coating, allowing food to brown without sticking to the pan. This coating is made from C8, which may be released into the air as gas if the heat is too high.

Ingredients:

· Aluminium

· Teflon (made from C8)


Calories: 0

Open Project

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POLYFLUOROALKYL

Drinking Water from Tap

Water pure enough for drinking released from a faucet attached to a sink. C8 contamination has been found in drinking water supplies of more than 6 million people in the United States.

Ingredients:

· H20

· Chlorine

· Limescale

· Polyfluoroalkyl substances (C8)


Calories: 0

Open Project

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POLYFLUOROALKYL

Umbrella

a device consisting of a circular canopy of cloth on a folding metal frame supported by a central rod, used as protection against rain. Many umbrellas use teflon to strengthen the water repelling properties.

Ingredients:

· Nylon

· Teflon (made from C8)

· Stainless Steel


Calories: 0

Open Project

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FORMALDEHYDE

Bowtop

Primarily constructed of timber, the “vardos” is a traditional horse drawn wagon previously used by travellers as their home.

Ingredients:

·

·

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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FORMALDEHYDE

Caravan

Caravans built in the UK since WWII generally suffer from cheap production methods and synthetic materials. They are also particularly problematic in terms of humidity issues and bad insulation, baring limited ventilation.

Ingredients:

·

·

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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FORMALDEHYDE

Building Materials

Far from being an atmospheric condition of a far and distant future, elevated formaldehyde levels are part of the ordinary chemical ecologies of the modern mobile home. This layering of materials, forms a layering problem.

Ingredients:

·

·

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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VANADIUM

Anthropogenic Vanadium

Vanadium is used to create steel compounds, essential in steel structures which make up our built environment.

Ingredients:

· ferrovanadium


Calories: 0

Open Project

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VANADIUM

Anthropogenic Vanadium

Vanadium is used to create steel compounds, essential in steel structures which make up our built environment.

Ingredients:

· ferrovanadium


Calories: 0

Open Project

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VANADIUM

Metabolic Vanadium

Vanadium is metabolised by soil enzymes and broken down into different vanadate compounds which are then concentrated by larger organisms like fungi and tree bark, entering the food chain.

Ingredients:

· V


Calories: 0

Open Project

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VANADIUM

Metabolic Vanadium

Vanadium is metabolised by soil enzymes and broken down into different vanadate compounds which are then concentrated by larger organisms like fungi and tree bark, entering the food chain.

Ingredients:

· V


Calories: 0

Open Project

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VANADIUM

Global vanadium

Vanadium pollution is distributed globally into human environments by a global network of oil and gas pipes.

Ingredients:

· V2O5


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CYANOBACTERIA

Fertiliser granules

Urea breaks down very quickly in ammonia and today ¾ of the nutrients in the fertilizer are washed away before the plants absorb them allowing the nitrogen compounds to cascade through the environment.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CYANOBACTERIA

Corn

Farming is a major economic activity in Ohio. The United States, thanks to the large production from Ohio, has always been ranked one of the top producers of corn in the world.

Ingredients:

· Corn


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CYANOBACTERIA

Pig

High numbers of Concentrated animal feeding operations producing manure adding to pollution in Lake Erie.

Ingredients:

· Pork


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CYANOBACTERIA

Supermarket Trolley

A surge in crop yields produces abundance of food in the supermarkets.

Ingredients:

· Steel


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CYANOBACTERIA

Fog

Fog like the blooms transcend the boundaries of land and water.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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SULFUR

Four Yellow Ziggurats

Waste stockpiles of by-product sulfur formed into pyramid like ziggurats

Ingredients:

· Pure Waste Sulfur


Calories: 0

Open Project

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SULFUR

Roots

Sulfur is ingested through soil microbial activity into the plants in the roots, from here the food chain begins through bacteria, microbes, plant and animal bodies.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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SULFUR

Waterways

Natural sulfur is mainly emitted from the core of the earth through Hydrothermal Vents

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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SULFUR

Soil Organic Matter

Sulfur returns to the soil through the decomposition of biodiversity where the crops are not produced to be removed and sold.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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SULFUR

Alberta’s Tar Sands

The tar sands of Alberta are the world’s largest known reservoir of bitumen, used for oil production.

Ingredients:

· Lump of Bitumen Tar Sand


Calories: 0

Open Project

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BLACK COAL/ PARTICULATE MATTER

Black Coal

Piece taken from horizon 400 of the Lonea mine.

Ingredients:

· Coal


Calories: 7,800 – 8,000/kg

Open Project

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BLACK COAL/ PARTICULATE MATTER

Fern

Piece taken from horizon 400 of the Lonea mine.

Ingredients:

· Coal


Calories: 7,800 – 8,000/kg

Open Project

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BLACK COAL/ PARTICULATE MATTER

Barabe

Piece taken from horizon 400 of the Lonea mine.

Ingredients:

· Coal


Calories: 7,800 – 8,000/kg

Open Project

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BLACK COAL/ PARTICULATE MATTER

Momarlani

Piece taken from horizon 400 of the Lonea mine.

Ingredients:

· Coal


Calories: 7,800 – 8,000/kg

Open Project

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BLACK COAL / PARTICULATE MATTER

Carbon Pile

Piece taken from horizon 400 of the Lonea mine.

Ingredients:

· Coal


Calories: 7,800 – 8,000/kg

Open Project

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PVC PLASTICS

Plastic Water Pipe

Since the development of plastic water pipes, pipe networks have become more dense, with their increasing usage within the dwelling. These pipes are now what shape the internal spaces of our modern infrastructures. It is these plastic pipes that are now the modern enclosure of our fertility.

Ingredients:

· Plastic


Calories: 0

Open Project

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PVC PLASTICS

Medical Exam Chair

The medical exam chair is a biotechnological reproductive instrument within our modern synthetic landscape.

Ingredients:

· Plastic


Calories: 0

Open Project

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PVC PLASTICS

Plastic Water Pipe Stack

With the increasing rates of synthetic reliance how can we start to understand the construction of our modern landscapes as the construction of our modern bodies?

Ingredients:

· Plastic


Calories: 0

Open Project

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PVC PLASTICS

Plastic Water Bottle

As synthetic materials become increasingly entwined within our daily lives, boundaries reduce as plastics are carried by multiscalar vehicles

Ingredients:

· Plastic


Calories: 0

Open Project

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PVC PLASTICS

Bed

As we move into an era of biotechnological fertilisation, the bed becomes dismantled as an object of production.

Ingredients:

· Springs


Calories: 0

Open Project

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TEARGAS

Tear Gas Canister

When a tear gas canister explodes, CS powder sprays into the air and adheres to any moisture it can find, that means the tears in your eyes, the sweat on your skin, the grease in your hair, and the saliva and mucus that covers your mouth and airways.

Ingredients:

· 2-chlorobenzalmalononitrile

· Magnesium Oxide

· Magnesium Carbonate

· Potassium Perchlorate

· Aluminium Powder

· Nickel


Calories: 0

Open Project

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TEARGAS

Tear Gas Particles Filter

Nano housing makes people have no space to hide from tear gas if it is hit in our house, the window filter protects domestic space from being penetrated with tear gas.

Ingredients:

· 3M 2138 Particulate filter

· Breathable Mesh

· Adjustable Screen


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CADMIUM

Kidney

On long-term exposure to cadmium, renal tubular dysfunction develops in humans and animals.

Ingredients:

· Organic Matter


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CADMIUM

Dying Machine

Often, chemical and heavy metal will pass through the treatment process unchanged to enter the food chain and build up in downstream sediments.

Ingredients:

· Metal


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CADMIUM

Twill Weaving

While we are wearing the denim, the indigo molecules chip off and the dye only stays in the intersection of the strings. Same as our environment, the cotton string as the river and the indigo molecule as cadmium.

Ingredients:

· Cotton


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CALCIUM

Human Skeleton

Your bones contain 99% of your body's calcium. Sufficient levels of calcium intake promotes strong bones and ensures normal cell functioning.

Ingredients:

· Calcium


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CALCIUM

Rock Prosthesis

Limestone rocks are scattered within abandoned quarries and remain disused and vandalised. These are some of the proposed interventions of my studio project, prosthesis of the rocks, which promote specific movements to improve bone health.

Ingredients:

· Limestone

· Steel


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CALCIUM

Light Therapy

During the mid-1900s, phototherapy (artificial light therapy) was a popular practice to combat the spread of calcium deficiency. The UV light promotes the body’s production of vitamin D which is vital for your body to absorb and retain calcium.

Ingredients:

· UV


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CALCIUM

Milk

Milk is one of the most advertised sources of calcium due to its high concentration per serving of highly absorbable calcium.

Ingredients:

· Calcium

· Milk

· Packaging Board Coated in PE


Calories: 0

Open Project

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CALCIUM

Stalagmites

Stalagmites are calcium formations within the landscape. These are formed over hundreds of years and are typically found in limestone caves.

Ingredients:

· Limestone


Calories: 0

Open Project

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IRON

Red Blood Cell

Around 70% of the human body’s iron is found in the red blood cells. The haemoglobin carries oxygen around the body, giving the blood its red colour, the tissues energy and the cells life.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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IRON

I-Beam

The technical development of iron throughout the Industrial Revolution overhauled the form and function of constructions. Iron has metamorphosed our built environment, and come to shape and facilitate the social order of our spaces today.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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IRON

Liver

The liver functions as the master iron regulator within the human body, producing hepcidin, which controls iron homeostasis. The balance of too much or too little iron can be traced in the liver.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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IRON

Drill

Constructing with iron above ground is synergistic to the hollowing of the earth below. In the largest iron mine in the world, in Kiruna, Northern Sweden, the equivalent of six Eiffel Towers are mined every single day.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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IRON

Cast Iron Pan

Cooking in cast-iron cookware can leach elemental iron into water and food, remediating diet-induced iron deficiency anaemia. A liquid must boil in the iron for 10 minutes to fortify the contents.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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IRON

Red Blood Cell

Iron is a crucial bio-element for most forms of life. In the human metabolism, it fluctuates as haemochromatosis, an overload in the liver, or anaemia, the most common dietary deficiency worldwide, causing fatigue or an elevated heart rate.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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MICROFIBRES

T-shirt

T-shirts represent the fast fashion market that makes up 40 billion US dollars in the 1.5 trillion US Dollar in the global apparel market. This is projected to grow and consequently means a rise in microfibres as we continue to treat clothing as disposable.

Ingredients:

· Polyesters


Calories: 0

Open Project

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MICROFIBRES

Disintegrated T-shirt

Cheaper supply chains have an effect on the build quality of clothing, this has a direct effect on the rate of microfibres produced in each garment over its lifetime. Clothing suddenly leaves among us in our air, water and soil slowly metabolising and changing the organic make of conjectures at a microbial scale.

Ingredients:

· Polyesters

· Nylons

· Neoprenes

· Synthetic Wools

· Synthetic Leather


Calories: 0

Open Project

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MICROFIBRES

Washing Machine

Stalagmites are calcium formations within the landscape. These are formed over hundreds of years and are typically found in limestone caves.

Ingredients:

·


Calories: 0

Open Project

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MICROFIBRES

Mannequin

This represents our consumer culture. In the UK on average clothing purchased from fast fashion outlets are used for less than 2 years producing monumental amounts of clothing waste every year. This is a reflection of how we perceive clothing and every season requires a new look being an unnecessary pressure.

Ingredients:

· Fashion weeks globally


Calories: 0

Open Project

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MICROFIBRES

Deconstructed Fabric

Microfibres break down in a variety of ways based on the way it was produced and weaved which means how they interact with the environment varies. Some threads are more variable according to recent studies. This could be a possibility in textile design to control the end life of the fabric in order to be less harmful to the environment.

Ingredients:

· Polyesters

· Nylons

· Neoprenes

· Synthetic Wools

· Synthetic Leather


Calories: 0

Open Project

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Calcium and the Post-industrial Body and Landscape


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Vanadium Landscape


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Hydrophobic Hydrophiles


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A Bloom In Disruption


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Alberta’s Sulfur Cycles


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The Denim River


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Heritage of Topography


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Plastic Fertilities


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Tears Topography


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The Right to Breathe


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Ferrous World, Anaemic Body.


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Moving with Microfibres


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we invite you to float, fly, swim, move through it.



We recommend travelling by MOUSE:



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You are about to enter a New Metabolic Order,

we invite you to float, fly, swim, move through it.



For the best experience we recommend travelling by MOUSE on desktop.



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Launch event, 01.10.20

Manifesto theatrical reading

In conversation with Hannah Landecker, Susan Shuppli and Kumi Naidoo.

VISIT EVENT
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Learning from the First Nations of Alberta Canada who engaged in a series of Tar Sands Healing Walks against oil extraction between the years of 2010- 2014, the project proposes a path on the site of the prospective decommissioned Syncrude Oil Company. Along the route are five interventions each based on collaborating with nature in the bioremediation of toxic landscapes. The research focused on the inhabitants, now erased and displaced, of a site faced with extraction and destruction, from human to more-than-human dwellers.

From the long colonial history of the site tied up within oil production, First Nations and other indigenous communities have faced violent exploitation. As a result the tar sands projects are considered to be ‘a slow industrial genocide’ against First Nations bands and tribes, as well as Metis and Inuit populations. The project understands this through three main aspects; the forced removal of indigenous dwellers from their lands, the subsequent destruction of these lands and lastly the false promise of their treaty rights for a right to clean air, water and access to their lands.

Along with the colonization of the indigenous humans, is the total destruction of these habitats for all other organisms. The site, previously a healthy ecosystem almost untouched by anthropogenic industries, is part of the Canadian boreal ecosystem, one of the world’s largest carbon reservoirs. The project considers the landscape as the architecture, and these dwellers as both the clients and stakeholders. As well as this, the project relies upon methods of bioindication. Through understanding the limits at which life can thrive, survive or cease to exist, and how to read individual organisms along this spectrum, bioindication becomes a language with which to read the landscape.

Walking Through Topographies of Sulfur proposes a 20km long path, taking around 5 hours to complete, with 5 interventions along the route from West to East. More-than-human perspectives have driven the design from plant, to animal to substance. Each intervention allows the participant to perform a different mode of walking through topographies of sulfur, moving Up, Within, Through, Around and Over.

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Four Yellow Ziggurats


Waste stockpiles of by-product sulfur formed into pyramid like ziggurats.


Ingredients:


· Pure Waste Sulfur


Calories: n/a

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Charlotte Bonnie Toro

Charlotte has been tasting sulfur since 1994. She is a recent graduate of the Royal College of Art in London. Since beginning this postgraduate her work focussed on questions surrounding the Anthropocene, particularly researching entanglements between human rights and rights of nature. She was born in Chile and then grew up between Barbados and Scotland. After beginning Sculpture and Environmental Art at the Glasgow School of Art she transferred to Architecture early on where she completed her B.Arch. She spent a year working as an Architectural Assistant in Amsterdam at Office Winhov before moving to London to complete her Masters in Architecture.

CONTACT WEBSITE
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In 1969 the river Cuyahoga in Cleveland caught fire, not once but 13 times. Invisible and ignored until it was too late, industry pollution continued to build up to this catastrophic result prompting protests and campaigns, catalysts for the 1972 Clean Water Act signed by President Richard Nixon. Environmental restrictions were imposed on industry but not on farming. Thus a new cycle began.

Between 1950 – 1960 was the introduction of the Green Revolution, spear headed by private organizations such as the Rockefeller and Ford foundations. This green revolution was to be the response to rapid population growth in developed regions and third world famine, ditching the traditional farming methods for a more intensive, scientifically aided process to drastically increase and maximise crop yields. Agriculture now became industrial agriculture.

There was a shift to the use of synthetic fertilizers. Urea becoming a popular choice. This commonly used fertilizer has the highest nitrogen content of all solid NPK fertilizers in use. Its ready availability coupled with its inexpensive price tag made it a popular choice for farmers buying into the green revolution and is still the most commonly used fertilizer today.

Decades of excessive synthetic fertiliser use has saturated the soil, worsening it each year, to the point that it refuses to absorb anymore, exposing ammonia to cascade through the environment and into water bodies sparking cyanobacteria blooms so large they are visible from space. The blooms occur annually and like the fires are not seen until it’s too late. A product of historic injustice and pursuit for artificial agricultural growth the blooms suffocate and scar marine life secreting cyanotoxins and eventually suffocate water bodies into dead zones void of oxygen as the blooms decompose. Lake Erie, host to the most notable of the blooms once had its own kidney, the great black swamp, however, was stripped of it in place of the industrial farming operations we see in Northern Ohio today.

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Fertiliser Granules


Urea breaks down very quickly in ammonia and today ¾ of the nutrients in the fertilizer are washed away before the plants absorb them allowing the nitrogen compounds to cascade through the environment.


Ingredients:


·


Calories: n/a

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Cyprian Boateng

Cyprian first swam in cyanobacteria in 1994. He is currently completing his MA in Architecture at the Royal College of Art after graduating with first class honours from his undergraduate degree, during which he was selected for an Erasmus exchange scholarship to study at École Nationale Supérieure d'Architecture de Paris-La Villette. After a year at Hawkins Brown working on international projects responding to distinct climatic risks Cyprian followed this up by going on to work in Tokyo, Japan for Shigeru Ban Architects, responding to his interests in emergency architecture and humanitarian design to climatic emergency, further explored in his first year MA project ‘A bloom in disruption’ which addressed the annual algal blooms plaguing Lake Erie. Cyprian also works closely with the Stephen Lawrence Charitable trust and was selected as part of SLCT Class of 2020.

CONTACT
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In April of 2017, Denis Manturov, Russia’s minister of industry and trade, announced the government's plan to expand the state’s production of vanadium. He stated, “Russia has the world’s largest deposits of vanadium ore. According to state plans, production should be significantly expanded at the majority of Russia’s largest vanadium fields over the coming years.” This statement highlights vanadium’s importance in the body of anthropogenic systems. It followed an announcement by three of the largest shareholders of Evraz: that they are selling off their shares in the company.

Vanadium Landscape locates itself in Russia, the second-largest vanadium producer in the world, and looks at Evraz, one of the largest metallurgical companies in the country. Following the supply chain of vanadium, the Russian landscape becomes abstracted into a series of anthropogenic systems and boundaries, becoming values which the Vanadium Landscape simulation is based on.

The mine is a point of conjuncture between the natural flow of vanadium and the anthropogenic use of the substance. Russian Mining Legislation sees Subsoil substance as State Property. Only once the substance crosses the legal boundary of the soil layer, it enters private ownership. In the case of Evraz, its ownership is further broken down into shares, voting rights and representative companies. The substance body defined by human systems of legislation, abstracting the physical body of vanadium into values.

Approaching the mine as a point of conjuncture between the natural flow of vanadium and the anthropogenic use of the substance. Russian Mining Legislation sees Subsoil substance as State Property. Only once the substance crosses the legal boundary of the soil layer, it enters private ownership. In the case of Evraz, its ownership is further broken down into shares, voting rights and representative companies. The substance body defined by human systems of legislation, abstracting the physical body of vanadium into values.

Vanadium Landscapes aims to link shifts in human systems, to changes in vanadium levels in the atmosphere, soil and other bodies. The flow of vanadium through post-Industrial metabolism is largely determined by its physicochemical state and its relation to other substances. Creating a space of contradiction and multiple dualities, in which vanadium becomes the pharmakon, both a medicine and a poison.

The origin of the pharmakon is a synthesis of remedy, poison and scapegoat. In Plato’s Phaedrus dialogue; writing is offered as a remedy for memory loss, but refused as it would not remedy the memory loss but merely act as a way of reminding. As vanadium is metabolised at natural levels it proves to be essential in various bodily functions. In the cell, vanadium compounds act to promote entry to S-phase of p53-dependent apoptosis; this can be responsible for tumor reduction. However, an increased inhalation of vanadium pentoxide can lead to cell oxidation and DNA damage, resulting in an increased risk of cancer. A single element responsible for the prevention and the cause of cancer. Vanadium possesses the same ambivalence for cancer as writing for memory loss.

The result is a proposal of a simulation, which forecasts the metabolic flows of a substance based on the activity of human and non-human stakeholders. The intent of the project is to become a design tool, which shifts the environmental conversations of spatial design.

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Tree of Life


Ingredients:


· Vanadium


Calories: n/a

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Kristofers Scipanovs

Kristofers first touched a vanadium phone in 1995. Having moved to the UK in 2007 his design practice has been significantly shaped by both the post soviet conditions of Latvia and his experience of living in the UK. During his postgraduate degree, he has looked at the post-industrial metabolism of vanadium and the human systems which control it, leading to an environment of slow and invisible violence. Vanadium Landscape speculates a digital platform focused on communicating changes to the metabolic flow of vanadium controlled by human activity.

CONTACT Instagram
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In the age of Industrial Capitalism, where costs are being cut to make profits, there has been an increased demand to produce alternative products that last longer, are lighter, and cheaper to produce. The inorganic substance Formaldehyde has led the way in multiple innovations across industry since its accidental discovery in 1859 to its first application in 1907 creating the first plastic-Bakelite. These include the generation of your IKEA furniture, that new-car smell, painted walls, and the majority of products inside your makeup bag. However, Formaldehyde seeps from much of the engineered woods that give our homes comfort and security forming residues of industrialisation. Welcome to the Post-Industrial Metabolism! Matter is no longer only travelling through our bodies, but our bodies are now travelling through matterWhat are the consequences of this synthetic substance on more-than-human metabolism? Furthermore, who are the social groups using these products and what are the hidden agendas behind their distribution?

This project investigates the problem of indoor pollution, more specifically what Michelle Murphy defines as “sick building syndrome”.This phenomenon describes a situation where occupants of a building suffer from illness or chronic disease from the space in which they work or reside. Sick building syndrome provides an understanding of how environmental politics moves indoors. ​Mobile homes which are now almost exclusively constructed of engineered woods and plastics are bound by formaldehyde-based resins and adhesives. The continuous layering of caravans accommodating often marginalised gypsies and travellers results in a layering of problems.

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BowTop


Primarily constructed of timber, the “vardos” is a traditional horse drawn wagon previously used by travellers as their home.


Ingredients:


· Formaldehyde


Calories: n/a

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Tonderai Maboreke

Tonderai started breathing contaminated air in 1994. He is a Second year MA Architecture student and recipient of the AIA UK 2016 student award. After graduating, Tonderai went on to work in Taiwan and then the UK. Eager to continue exploring opportunities around the world, this experience fostered his interest in culture, time and space.

CONTACT
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During the Manhattan Project of 1945, US scientists wanted to find a way to distil uranium to create the first atomic bomb. They bonded fluorine gas with carbon molecules to create a fluorochemical with unprecedented cooling and hydrophobic capabilities. This group of chemicals is known as Polyfluoroalkyl substances, with C8 being the most ubiquitous of them all. It’s discovery resulted in the Trinity Nuclear Testing in New Mexico, and the subsequent Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

Following the conclusion of World War II, Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M) acquired and improved the technology for fluorocarbon production. Opening the first commercial fluorocarbon production plant in 1951 on the bank of the Mississippi River in Cottage Grove, Minnesota. Signifying the transition of C8 from a substance of necropower into a substance of capitalism. This chemical was then utilised by DuPont to create Teflon® in 1948, a product synonymous with non-stick cookware and stain-repellent fabrics. Bringing this substance of capitalism, into the domain of domesticity, further compromising the internal boundaries of human and non-human systems. Exposure to this forever chemical causes immune system deterioration; liver, spleen and bone marrow damage; cholesterol and triglyceride increase; kidney and testicular cancer; reproductive and developmental complications. Both 3M and Dupont were aware of these health issues since the 1970s. Nonetheless, both companies continue to produce their toxic synthetics, still to this day. C8 is currently used in a range of products such as fast-food packaging; stain-resistant carpets, rugs, and furniture; non-stick cookware; water repellent clothing; paints, varnishes, sealants and cleaning products. The latter was used extensively in The Buncefield Fire of December 11th 2005 in Hemel Hempstead UK, resulting in the drop of calving success rate from 70% down to 11%, due to miscarriages, birth defects and low birth weight.

The proliferation of C8 is not unique to Hemel Hempstead, nor the 3M manufacturing plant. Trace levels of C8 have been recorded in global water supplies, and within the blood of 98% of Americans and within the blood of both water and land-based fauna across the world. We are living in a new metabolic order in which chemicals such as C8 do not degrade or discriminate, they only accumulate.

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Double Cheeseburger


A beef burger with a slice of cheese on it, served in a bread roll. If the cow was exposed to C8 before being made into a beef patty, this would provide C8 a pathway into the consumer’s system through ingestion.


Ingredients:


· Brioche Bun

· Ground beef

· Polyfluoroalkyl substances (C8)

· Cheese slice


Calories: 440

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Remi Kuforiji

Remi was born with polyfluoroalkyl in his bloodstream in 1997. During his undergraduate he explored the potential of co-housing typologies across different contexts, which brought him to research and work in India, Nigeria, China and Norway. Remi’s first project at the RCA titled Hydrophobic Hydrophiles proposes a dynamic wetland scheme which facilitates optimum microbial activity, in response to Polyfluoroalkyl proliferation. Furthemore, Remi is currently researching the ramifications of petroleum oil extraction in the Niger Delta, as well as the impacts of coloniality and the systemic dismissal of African oral history.

CONTACT
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Heritage of Topography concentrates around the movement and density of particulate matter and its unavoidable sedimentation in the Jiu Valley in Romania. The 45 km long former industrial settlement along the Jiu River, deep In the Carpathian Mountains gave birth to a community whose identity is inseparable from the carbonized matter. A community rushing to “turn the earth inside out“, creating voids underground and new multi-scalar topographies above it

But there was a time when the population along this river lived without the carbon matter. The Momârlani have populated the area and lived in self-sustaining isolation for thousands of years before being forced to move higher into the mountains.

Today, as the mines are closing, and the relics of geological and human violence keep the valley frozen in time, Heritage of Topography asks how can a community start living without the matter that was brought to its creation. As part of the design research, a series of interventions are proposed which play along the border between ruin and monument, not just of human, but of other-than-human violence.

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Black Coal


Piece taken from horizon 400 of the Lonea mine.


Ingredients:

· coal


Calories: 7,800 – 8,000 kcal/kg

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Alexa Szekeres

Alexa was never without black coal. Her practice is oriented around the personal engagement of inhabitants with space and an interest in challenging the protocols of inhabitation. Her work proposes architectural narratives that reflect on questions around heritage and collective memory in the context of the Anthropocene. Before moving to London, Alexa worked with Raumlabor Berlin where she led the design and construction of an installation of un-learning as part of the long term project The New Alphabet at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt.

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How can we start to understand the world through a different perspective; no longer plastic flowing through us, but rather, us flowing through plastic?

Plastics are the most prolific material of the 21st century and as we continue to consume in a world that increasingly shows the effects of our modern urbanisations, the social belief that we can separate ourselves from the natural world is one of an ignorant illusion. Dispersed into the air, absorbed within the rain, lodged within soils, introduced into plants, consumed by animals and residing within the tissues and bones of human bodies. As synthetic materials become increasingly entwined within our daily lives, boundaries reduce and there becomes no such thing as an ‘unaffected body’. It is no longer appropriate to imagine ourselves separate from the environments in which we inhabit and create

Plastics are used widely throughout the home and in infrastructure. As areas are being urbanised, our bodies are being affected in ways which are invisible to the naked eye but have a measurable impact upon the ways in which we function. The increasing rates of synthetic reliance is contributing to dramatically reduced fertility across both human and non-human bodies. How can we start to understand the construction of our modern landscapes as the construction of our modern bodies on both a macroscopic and microscopic scale?

As fertility levels drop due to the leaching of synthetic endocrine disruptors from plastics such as PVC water pipes into the environment, technology is being used to aid fertility. As we continue to consume plastics, we are becoming increasingly dependent on human-centric biotechnological aids for reproduction. The result is the formation of an industry around fertility worldwide. The procedure of In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) has accentuated the distinct reproductive role of women and thus designated the female body as a natural object of economic intervention. This biotechnological reproduction is a form of modern heterosexual fertilisation. The cis-female, those whose gender identity matches their sex assigned at birth, has become an economic entity in the biopolitical relationship of both production and exchange. As humans continue to synthetically pollute wide landscapes, the increasing reliance on technological reproduction becomes an instrument for reproductive control and segregation.

Plastic Fertilities strings together the connections between the enclosures of plastics and the enclosures of fertility as sites of metabolic disorder in our current society.

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Medical Exam Chair


The medical exam chair is a biotechnological reproductive instrument within our modern synthetic landscape.


Ingredients:


· Plastic


Calories: n/a

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Claire Greenland

In 1994, Claire was born, inheriting the plastics of her ancestors, and ever since has continued to silently metabolise these synthetic substances. As we move into a world increasingly reliant on plastics, Claire delves into the landscapes of our bodies and our surroundings, making visible the traces they leave. It is this ‘being’ in synthetic landscapes that has primarily influenced the direction of Claire’s work, understanding the connections between our synthetic obsessions and the increase in obscure hormonal imbalances. Delving into relationships between landscapes, women and economic systems, population production is at the core of Claire’s practice. Her architectural background allows her to investigate ways in which the built environment is entangled in biochemical pathways during an era of increasingly evident human-induced alterations across the Earth.

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Since June 12, 2019, 88% of Hong Kong’s 7.4 million residents have been tear gassed. Police fired 16,000 tear gas, pepper balls and used water cannons to disperse activists in the traditional venue for large demonstrations. 9216 people have been arrested for offences including unlawful assembly, disorderly conduct in public and obstructing police. The political brutality from the government and the physical violence from the police create a city of tears where people are forced to cry.

Tears Topography is an ongoing project gathering evidence on violation of human rights about tear gas dispersal in Hong Kong through mapping areas of tear gas fired to show the fact that every citizen witnessed could not be denied and misinterpreted.

The project has mapped the effects of tear gas attacks in the built environment in Hong Kong, looked at the microscopic chemistry of tears as well as the spatial account of events in regards to wind direction and ways in which different material surfaces register the chemical over time. The project is published on tearstopography.com to show and gather spatial evidence of police brutality. Spatial evidence has been provided to the ongoing All-Party Parliamentary Group on Hong Kong Inquiry into violations of human rights and humanitarian principles by the Hong Kong Police Force.

The methodologies are to examine how new architecture could emerge by creating a platform for civic engagement of resistance, learning from tear gas attacks to reimagine the city: Which are the places where people can protest without suffering; How could we design city without tear gas violence; How we protect our homes from attack even if we are not protesting. The developed intervention is a proposal in which the project could implement a new understanding of architecture, in the level of the city, the level of home and the level of urban protest worldwide.

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Tear Gas Canister


When a tear gas canister explodes, CS powder sprays into the air and adheres to any moisture it can find, that means the tears in your eyes, the sweat on your skin, the grease in your hair, and the saliva and mucus that covers your mouth and airways.


Ingredients:

· 2-chlorobenzalmalononitrile

· magnesium oxide

· magnesium carbonate

· potassium perchlorate

· aluminium powder

· nickel


Calories: n/a

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Tim Chan

Tim first inhaled teargas in 2014. Born and raised in Hong Kong, he is an architectural designer and a Master of Arts in Architecture graduate from the Royal College of Art. From the two years of individual research experience in London, Tim questioned what is the future of practice in architecture and collectives, and what is the agency of architecture in the metabolic environment we live in.

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The rise of fast fashion changed the meaning of a pair of jeans. Customers are no longer looking for functionality, but rather aestheticism. Fast fashion offers low prices on clothes, and retailers are looking for factories that can produce a massive amount of garments with an extremely low cost. Many jeans factories migrated from the United States to Mexico and eventually moved to China, Indonesia and Bangladesh for lower production costs. Unfortunately, those countries don’t have the environmental regulations as strict as the United States.

Making a pair of jeans is a very water and chemical intensive procedure involving a lot of hot water. The textile industry has one of the lowest rates of water efficiency; the water is used once for dying or treatment of the textiles and will be discharged into the river. As a result, the pollution is extremely concentrated in some areas. The textile industry including the denim industry discharged ten thousand chemicals and heavy metals into our river, which includes the heavy metal, cadmium.

Water treatment plants cannot cope with many hazardous chemicals and heavy metals such as cadmium. Often, chemical and heavy metals will pass through the treatment process unchanged to enter the food chain and build up in downstream sediments. They can also be converted into other hazardous substances and/or accumulate in other wastes generated during the treatment process.

The metabolic process of the dye within a pair of worn denim is similar to that of our environment. While we are wearing the denim, the indigo molecules chip off, and the dye only stays in the intersection of the strings. The cotton string is the river and the indigo molecule is the cadmium. While the cadmium flows through the river, they get trapped within our farmland and inside the body of the organism.

In the ecosystem, bioaccumulation occurs when an animal accumulates cadmium from the environment into its body. Biomagnification of cadmium occurs when the concentration of cadmium increases from one link in the food chain to another, including the human bod

In the rice-field in Dongguan which is near Xintang, their rice is 4 times over the limit of standard. In a 1 ha of rice field there are 1000 milligrams of cadmium trapped in our rice.

Long-term exposure to cadmium causes renal tubular dysfunction which develops in humans and animals. It has been widely researched that we cannot metabolise cadmium in our body as it will only rebind, re release and accumulate within the kidney, eventually, resulting in renal failure. That cadmium will also increase bone-demineralization gene expression that code for proteins that help form osteoclasts and accelerate the process of demineralization.

The presence of cadmium and other hazardous substances in the environment highlights the issues of the traditional approach to industrial discharges. The consequences for ecosystems and human health are severe, and the clean-up of hazardous substances is a difficult and costly process. What is needed is a new approach to hazardous chemicals, one that addresses the problem at source, and eliminates all discharges of cadmium and other chemicals into the river. The redesign of products and processes to phase out the use and discharge of hazardous chemicals has proven to be the best approach to tackling these issues. Brands should also sign a longer contract with the manufacturer so they can work tightly together to deliver products that are truly sustainable.

The Denim River rethinks the architecture of jeans to address the cadmium pollution in fibre, clothing, pigment factories, the river, the rice-field and eventually our body.

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Kidney


On long-term exposure to cadmium, renal tubular dysfunction develops in humans and animals.


Ingredients:


· Organic Matter


Calories: n/a

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Yu Hin Chun

Yu Hin Chun started to use denim as his second skin since 1998. He is a Hong Kong based designer who graduated from the Leicester School of Architecture, and worked in Hong Kong after his graduation. During his postgraduate degree, he has worked with a collective in Barcelona, to renovate an old textile building in order to bring collectives and the neighbourhood closer and raise an awareness of the existence of the building. His most recent research on the Denim River focuses on the capital of denim, Xintang, in China and aims to rethink the architecture of jeans to address the cadmium pollution in fibre, clothing, pigment, factories, the river, the rice-field and eventually our body.

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The rate of rickets has been reported to be the highest in 60 years. Our bones, our bodies and our landscape are losing calcium.

Osteoconstruction looks at calcium, a substance essential for the functioning of all living organisms. By uncovering the timeline of calcium metabolism and drawing parallels between the architecture of the cell and the architecture of our built environment, the project examines how our relationship with calcium shapes not only the structure of our bodies and bones but our homes, cities and landscape.

Molecules of calcium have been extracted, transferred and multiplied in cells, bones, bodies, medical institutions, quarries and landscapes. The performances of these sites of calcium are directly affected by our relationship with the substance, shifting, transforming and evolving in response.

The Victorian, mid-1900s and current era are three moments in time that represent key events in the history of calcium metabolism. Poor diets and a lack of sunlight exposure due to thick smog was the main cause for widespread bone disease during the Victorian era. In the mid-1900s, the role of sunlight and vitamins in the development of bones was discovered and the built environment altered in response. Light therapy was a popular practice; seaside towns transformed into popular resorts, hospitals opened light departments and nurseries held light therapy sessions. Today, more than half of the population in the UK have insufficient levels of vitamin D, vital for normal calcium metabolism. Research suggests that change of habits such as indoor living and dietary choices are playing a significant role in the increase of this rate. The project aims to learn from the associated social and political issues to speculate on this new, post-industrial era.

As the image of the normative body has transformed, so has the image of the landscape. 53.6 million tonnes of calcium carbonate is quarried annually. These areas of mineral rich land are becoming increasingly hollowed and disrupted, as is our bone matrix. Even in areas with an abundance of calcium in the landscape, very little of it enters the bodies of those living in close proximity, the poorest settlements of which are the first to experience calcium deficiency today.

Osteoconstruction aims to envision the role of architecture within this era of calcium metabolism, proposing a series of support structures to rehabilitate the body and quarry through the production of calcium. A new support system is required for this metabolic era; a system which can and ought to adapt as our relationship with calcium continues to change.

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Human Skeleton


Your bones contain 99% of your body's calcium. Sufficient levels of calcium intake promotes strong bones and ensures normal cell functioning.


Ingredients:

· Calcium


Calories: n/a

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Rachel Housley

Rachel started developing calcium in her body in 1994. She is a London-based designer and researcher, whose work engages in performance, processes of production, metabolism and reuse, spatial experience and materiality. To date, her work spans across multiple disciplines from architecture to materials science and curation. Since graduating, her area of interest has been focused on the entwined relationship between the politics of the body and politics of the land, questioning the role of architecture within reconstructed environments and its ability to transform the bodies and spaces which we inhabit.

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In the built environment, there are approximately 1 trillion, 539 billion, 720 million kilograms of iron, and in the bodies of humans, around 27 million, 300 thousand kilograms of iron.

In its earliest recorded form, around 3200BC, meteoric ‘sky iron’ was forged into shovels – the first instance of iron being employed to hew and form our surroundings. The timeline evolves – from medieval tie-rods and anchor plates, the development of the cast-iron process that catalysed the productions and geography of the Industrial Revolution, to rivets, rebar, nuts, bolts, rolled steel, the skeletal frame with the I-beam, the spark of the weld arc. Microscopic metallurgy has transmuted our structural and social form, and yet it continues to have profoundly different effects at the site of its extraction, and the bodies of those that inhabit such spaces.

Whilst the discovery of iron ore has metamorphosed our built environment, shaping and facilitating the social order of our spaces today, within the human body, iron deficiency anaemia has come to be the most common and widespread nutritional disorder worldwide. The scarcity is expressed in fatigue and an elevated heart rate, in pale hands, yellowed skin, shortness of breath and a bodily coldness.

Ferrous World, Anaemic Body explores the disparities of iron - the external saturation and the bodily deficit - with iron as the lifeblood of both the structures it builds, and the bodies that construct them.

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Red Blood Cell


Around 70% of the human body’s iron is found in the red blood cells. The haemoglobin carries oxygen around the body, giving the blood its red colour, the tissues energy and the cells life.


Ingredients:


· Blood


Calories: n/a

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Freya Bolton

Freya is a designer and maker based in London. She designs and builds architectural projects with a focus on public and ecological engagement, often including material reuse and reappropriation. Her body is deficient of the same iron she constructs with. She holds a BSc in Architecture from The Bartlett School of Architecture and is currently working in collaboration with Performance Electrics gGmbH at E-WERK, Luckenwalde, designing and building an architectural sculpture with a closed-circuit biogas fuel system with the collective Cherry26.

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Moving with Microfibres traces microfibres as it flows through and becomes the natural world. In recent history clothing has become a key conversation point in discussions around the anthropocene and microfibres part of this narrative.

How did we get to the point where all drinkable water, edible food, and the air we breathe has been colonised by microfibres carrying contaminants it's exposed to: from pathogenic chemicals to microbial bacteria? How did our clothes become part of our biology, ingesting microfibres that diffuse into our bodies going through the lymphatic system and into the liver and gallbladder and while we’ve been led to believe the exposure to this is negligible in the human body. The real threat isn’t direct exposure to microfibres and the other associated chemicals, but the chronic cumulative exposure animal life has with microfibres. Sea life that consumes these pollutants makes its way up the food chain with exponential toxicities levels. These microfibres have been present in our world since the invention of synthetic fibres and most notably polyester which has been used for commercial textiles.

As clothing technology develops and our relationship to clothing changes, we need to realise that our habits are detrimental to the environment and that synthetic clothing has a long-lasting presence well after we are dead. Due to the rising concerns, legislative changes to the production of synthetic clothing needs to be along the lines of 100% recyclable (with the inclusion of microfibres) and waste management deems it illegal to dispose of synthetics. This should include and not be limited to textile technology, procurements and supply chains and human behaviour.

Microfibre pollution indicates the consumption of clothing as they leave the machines. The only real solution to this problem is completely abandoning hyper consumerism. The design research looks at the spatial implication of this opening up existing spaces dedicated to clothing for other potential uses both in cultural activities and alternative waste management.

Moving with microfibres means modifying the nodes that microfibres interact with to have a meaningful effect on how microfibres metabolises with the greater environment. This project posits a circular supply chain that begins within the distribution centre, and as of the department store, proposing alternate uses to keep a brand like H&M relevant when its core business - fast fashion - is challenged.

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T-shirt


T-shirts represent the fast fashion market that makes up 40 billion US dollars in the 1.5 trillion US Dollar in the global apparel market. This is projected to grow and consequently means a rise in microfibres as we continue to treat clothing as disposable.


Ingredients:


· Polyesters

· Nylons

· Neoprenes

· Synthetic Wools

· Synthetic Leathers


Calories: n/a

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Mayola Tikaka

Mayola first encountered microfibres in 1995 when he started drinking water. He is an architectural designer and researcher. Born in South Africa and currently based in London, he has worked at various architectural practices where he has begun to expand and define his practice. As a designer his interests lie in the implications of space, data and human organisation and how it influences culture and global infrastructures. Mayola’s current research Moving with Microfibres, looks to understand the disproportionate effects on raw material producers, makers and citizens of the global south that the “global toxic supply chains in clothing” has and supports the insatiable consumption of the global north has a burden.

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Metabolic Selves

In our collaboration with the Serpentine Galleries’ Back to Earth initiative and the General Ecology project, Metabolic Selves call for a New Metabolic Order, a platform for understanding the shifting nature of our metabolic selves. To ingest in a post-industrial world is an inadvertent act, no longer a process of definitive input for desired output. Rather, ingestion in the Anthropocene reverses this lens, subjugating bodies to the same chemical influx as we have exerted on our environment. When we ingest matter into our bodies, we also ingest a chain of political signifiers. In order to reach a post-industrial understanding, there needs to be a shift away from considering pollution and pollutants as a process of cause and effect, and rather an acknowledgment of the joint history, and overlapping definitions of the human and the more-than human. Our platform proposes readings and conversations between substances and their relative stakeholders. Each project provides an understanding by which we can reassess the shifting nature and our existence in the era of post industrial metabolism.

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Metabolic Selves

Metabolic Selves are a collective of cross-disciplinary architectural researchers who met at the Royal College of Art, London. We are primarily engaged with deconstructing the perceived boundaries between matter, bodies, and spaces. We reconsider the metabolic processes that have emerged as a result of anthropogenic activity and the geopolitical systems entangled within them. Our work is concerned with the act of ingestion and the substances that consequently flow through bodies. Matter moves through us, and with it, we become the matter.